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Health Communication Materials Database

M/MC ID# PL BOL 201


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http://db.jhuccp.org/mmc/media/bol201.pdf


English Title: [The stories of Yoni]
Original Title: Las historias de Yoni: Un nuevo despertar: La historia de una muchacha que descubre los cambios de su cuerpo
Series Title: | Carpa Lila: Decidir te hace diferente |
Media Format: Comic Book
Date: 1998
Country: Bolivia
Subjects: JHU/PCS, Puberty, Child, Female, Adolescents, Pregnancy, Menstruation, Health Education, Anatomy, Genitalia, Sustainable Development
Audience: Women, Adolescents
Languages: Spanish
Description: 14 x 21 cm. 18 p. comic book. (Cover) Blue background with mustard text and a color illustration of a girl finding a blood stain on her sheets.
Producers: Salud Sexual y Reproductiva, Johns Hopkins University Population Communication Services (JHU/PCS), USAID, Bolivia Ministerio de Prevision Social y Salud Publica, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), Pathfinder International, Project Concern International (PC
Contact Name:
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health / Center for Communication Programs (CCP)
Address:
111 Market Place, Suite 310
Baltimore, MD 21202
United States


Phone: 410.659.6300
Website: http://www.jhuccp.org
Abstract: This is the story of Carina, a 12-year old girl who is going through puberty. She and her friend David go to the movies and get into a discussion about where babies come from. One day she wakes up and notices blood on her sheets. She is afriad to tell her mother but does tell a teacher at school. The teacher explains menstruation and how babies are conceived. She also reviews male reproductive an... more
Abstract: This is the story of Carina, a 12-year old girl who is going through puberty. She and her friend David go to the movies and get into a discussion about where babies come from. One day she wakes up and notices blood on her sheets. She is afriad to tell her mother but does tell a teacher at school. The teacher explains menstruation and how babies are conceived. She also reviews male reproductive anatomy. less


Notes: Yoni is a 19-year-old boy who has traveled the country with his uncle. During his trips he listened to his uncle's stories and became a great storyteller himself.|Produced by the Ministries of Health, Education and Sustainable Development of Bolivia with the Armed Forces, Municipal Governments, USAID, JHU/PCS, UNFPA, GTZ, PROCOSI, Focus/Pathfinder International, CEPAC, SERVIR and Project Concern International|The... more
Notes: Yoni is a 19-year-old boy who has traveled the country with his uncle. During his trips he listened to his uncle's stories and became a great storyteller himself.|Produced by the Ministries of Health, Education and Sustainable Development of Bolivia with the Armed Forces, Municipal Governments, USAID, JHU/PCS, UNFPA, GTZ, PROCOSI, Focus/Pathfinder International, CEPAC, SERVIR and Project Concern International|The Lilac Tent was the first, most visible, and most important project undertaken by the Bolivia National Rural Reproductive Health IEC Strategy. The purpose of the Lilac Tent was to generate community mobilization efforts and strengthen local capacity for reproductive health IEC activities. In October 1998, three lilac-colored tents began to travel through rural Bolivia disseminating reproductive health information and serving as the locus for IEC skills training nationwide. Each tent was designed for a specific region of the country: highlands, valleys, and plains. The tents housed videos, live music, theater and folklore dance troupes, mimes, games, puppet shows, and print and interactive multimedia material. The distinctive color for the tents came from the lilac-colored Las Manitos logo developed in the mid-1990's.|The tent was intended primarily for rural adolescents and young couples although market days and local holidays provided broader exposure of reproductive health messages to adult men and women. The messages disseminated during the Lilac Tentís tour dealt specifically with reproductive health, including STD prevention, safe motherhood, informed decision-making, and abortion prevention. There were also messages on environmental conservation and children and womenís rights.|Before the arrival of the Lilac Tent in each town, NGOs in charge of each tent worked with local authorities over a period of two weeks to coordinate logistics for the arrival and set up of the tent and to advocate continued support for reproductive health IEC activities in their communities. Artistic resources from the community were invited to join the enter-educate activities during the tentís three-day stop in each town. Concurrently, community radio operators were trained to disseminate reproductive health information. As part of the training, the radio operators received prototypes scripts and a reproductive health message toolkit for local production. The arrival of the tent in each town was marked by a carnival-style atmosphere. Balloons, posters, and flyers were distributed before and during the tentís visit. Community radio operators advertised the tent on the air and vehicles with megaphones made their way through the town. Local schools participated in reproductive health mural painting contests sponsored by the Lilac Tent.|For additional information, see "Communication Impact #5 (April 1999). less


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